that70srpc:

I find that, when writing bios, it’s really helpful to look at a list or a chart like the one above. Picking two or three traits from each chart and building a character based around them will give you a really interesting bio, because they will serve as a reminder that characters need depth and dimension.

Independent and clever.

VS.

Independent, clever, pretentious, and stubborn.

The first combination doesn’t come with any flaws, whereas the second will provide a more dynamic character.

(Source: dunst-rph)



11 Steps to Check Off Before Self-Publishing

lettersandlight:

image

Curious about striking out on your own, and tackling the world of self-publishing? Miral Sattar, CEO of NaNoWriMo sponsor Bibliocrunch, shares her 11-step checklist for self-publishing success:

Interested in self-publishing that NaNo novel you just spent all month…



Female Characters: A No-Win Situation
  • Female character: I love him!
  • Audience: Ugh, she's so annoying. All she does is think about him. She's such a weak character/mary sue/dependent/needy chick. I hope they get rid of her.
  • Female character: I hate him!
  • Audience: Wow, she's so heartless. After all he's done for her. She's such a bitch/diva/ice queen. I hope they get rid of her.



chescaleigh:

believeinrecovery:

A little table to how to get rid of all that negative self-talk. We have to learn look at the good in situations too, instead of dwelling on things we can’t change- because you know what? We may not be able to change what is happening but we CAN change how we view it! 

always reblog

(Source: believeinrecovery)



   Anonymous asked:
   I was wondering if you had any type of information on age progression with children as how would a four year old act what type of characteristics would he or she have

writeworld:

We are not a child psychology blog (or else we’re a stupendously bad child psychology blog). It is with heavy hearts, therefore, that we must admit that we do not have many (any) in-house resources for the developmental stages of tiny humans. We do, however, have links! 

I highly recommend the book The Writer’s Guide to Character Traits: Includes Profiles of Human Behaviors and Personality Types by Linda N. Edelstein for basic profiles of children in various social and psychological situations from the need-to-know perspective of a writer. 

Other than that, here are some resources for writing four(ish) year olds:

And here are some general resources on writing children:

Also, I bet there are some parents out there on Tumblr who may be willing resources for you, anon. If you’d like to be a resource for this anon on four year olds, please reply to this post. Please do not send us a message with your interest. (It’s much easier for us and for the anon and for everyone, really, if you just reply directly to the post.)

If anyone else has any resources they think would go nicely with this list, please send them along!

Thank you for… wondering…! 

-C






art-of-swords:

A Brief Introduction to Armoured Longsword Combat

  • By Matt Anderson and Shane Smith (ARMA Virginia Beach)

Most practitioners of historical fencing have not extensively explored armoured fighting techniques. This is due to several factors, including the expense and difficulty inherent in obtaining a decent reproduction harness.

The fact that most harness fighting techniques involve thrusting and violent grappling actions is also daunting. Still, several members of the ARMA, Virginia Beach study group have for several years had a keen interest in trying to recreate the type of harness fighting we see in the "fechtbuchs".

Not the hack and bash type of display commonly seen at Renn faires, or the armoured stick fighting practiced by some medieval reenacting groups, but something more like what might have really been seen in 15th century Europe. We knew from our examination of the "fechtbuchs" that real armoured fighting of the period was efficient, effective and brutal.

Certain tactical basics became apparent early on. The edge of the sword, for example, is relatively useless against plate armour. Most source texts show no edge blows at all. Rather, armoured sword fighting is all about putting the point into a relatively unprotected area.

In order to thrust effectively and accurately to these relatively small targets such as the face, armpit, inside of the elbow, and other areas which are not covered by plate armour, and defend them, half-swording is the predominant technique. 

Half-swording, with a firm grip closer to the point, gives one the thrusting accuracy to hit these relatively small areas. It also enables one to thrust with power and body weight behind the attack, often necessary in order to penetrate the maille and padded garments between the plate defenses.

Grappling moves such as trips and throws are an essential element as well. Levering with the sword, arm and wrist locks, even kicks and hand strikes are all useful techniques against an armoured man. It is often necessary to throw your opponent to the ground and perhaps hold him there in order to make an opening for your finishing move.

The more we studied the source texts, the more we realized that the only way to really learn how to fight in armour was to armour up and try to duplicate what we saw in the source texts. We have studied and experimented with several sources and many techniques but in this article, we will focus on what we have learned in our exploration of the armoured longsword techniques from Fiore Dei Liberi’s Flos Duellatorum.

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Association for Renaissance Martial Arts



3/27/14

If you are a piece
Then together
We’re a whole.
I hope you know
That I love you
And all your broken,
Fucked up pieces.

I want to be
The stardust
In your veins;
The start
Of a hurricane
Inside your heart.

And I will
Be the name
On the bullet
That goes through
Your head;
I’ll be the
Last breath
In your lungs
With a rope
Around your neck;
I am the slow beat
Of your heart
That matches pace
Exactly with mine.

That fire in your eyes
Belongs to me.
I set it there
And only I
Can put it out.
This ice in my heart
Belongs to you.
I’m growing cold
If you don’t thaw it soon
I won’t be able to
Love you when you get back.

I am yours
You are mine



thetrolliestcritic:



A Master List for Surviving An Apocalypse
Includes links and articles from around the web (& on Tumblr) that discuss possible ways of surviving & preparing for an apocalypse.


Read More

thetrolliestcritic:

A Master List for Surviving An Apocalypse

Includes links and articles from around the web (& on Tumblr) that discuss possible ways of surviving & preparing for an apocalypse.

Read More



Three Goals for Every Character

mooderino:

image

You can break down each character’s goals into three types: professional, private and personal.

‘Professional’ refers to the job that needs to be done. A monster has to be killed, a treasure has to be found, a wedding has to take place etc. This physical goal drives…



clevergirlhelps:


Reference
Dive reflex
Mermaid anatomy
Mythology
Facts and Legends
Types, types 2, types 3
Symbolism and History
Mermaids
Mockumentary, mockumentary whole
Species. Most agree merpeople are some strange mix of mammal and fish. You should probably determine to what extent merpeople are one or the other.

Fish. Fish have gills to help them take oxygen from the water. Some fish (like beta fish and arapaima) also need oxygen from the air; these fish usually live in freshwater. A fish’s tail moves in a side-to-side manner. Fish have extra fins to help them maneuver. Fish are cold-blooded and covered in scales, which protect them and can provide camouflage.

Mammal. Dolphin-like mammals (cetaceans) are totally dependent on air for oxygen. Their tails move in a up-and-down manner and have a different fin orientation. Cetaceans communicate and navigate via echolocation. They are warm-blooded. Cetaceans have hairless skin that easily scars. I used cetaceans for this post, because that is what many merpeople are based off, but you can also use mammals like otters, pinnipeds (see selkies), manatees, and dugongs. 
Read More

clevergirlhelps:

Reference

Species. Most agree merpeople are some strange mix of mammal and fish. You should probably determine to what extent merpeople are one or the other.

  • Fish. Fish have gills to help them take oxygen from the water. Some fish (like beta fish and arapaima) also need oxygen from the air; these fish usually live in freshwater. A fish’s tail moves in a side-to-side manner. Fish have extra fins to help them maneuver. Fish are cold-blooded and covered in scales, which protect them and can provide camouflage.
  • Mammal. Dolphin-like mammals (cetaceans) are totally dependent on air for oxygen. Their tails move in a up-and-down manner and have a different fin orientation. Cetaceans communicate and navigate via echolocation. They are warm-blooded. Cetaceans have hairless skin that easily scars. I used cetaceans for this post, because that is what many merpeople are based off, but you can also use mammals like otterspinnipeds (see selkies), manatees, and dugongs

Read More



oh-wikipedia:

championisjustatitle:

ozwinozwald:

inkerdoodle:

When you’re writing aND YOU CAN’T FIND THE RIGHT WORD

image

http://chir.ag/projects/tip-of-my-tongue/

you’re welcome

image

*reblogs for later reference*

(Source: fenfeiikou)



   yellowromeda asked:
   I don't really know how to articulate this question but I'm writing a short film that has an interaction between a separated couple after a disaster has ravaged their country. I'm trying to connect them back together after they've been apart six months and am having trouble being.. Concise. I feel like I'm rambling, what they're saying 'matters' to their relationship but I feel like it's bogging the film down. Got any tips on writing natural but simple dialogue?





Create an Apocalypse in Your Hometown, Using Google Maps

   spankitdammit81 asked:
   Help me please! I have a couple of scenes with police in my story. I want the questions to be authentic. Do you have a list where I could find interrogation techniques and such?

fixyourwritinghabits:

This book is pretty thorough; it’s not free, but it covers a lot of stuff. Check your library system for it, especially if the police don’t have too much of a role in your story. Reference For Writers has a master list here that might be more useful as well!





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